The New CDC Reports reveals the Least Safe Ways To Cook Chicken

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People in the U.S. love everything from wings to noodles soup. Love eating chicken. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) states that we eat it more More than any other meat. But tasty as it is, chicken has its downsides—namely that it’s a major contributor to foodborne illnesses. The CDC recently released a report that found part of the problem is in the way people prepare it. Continue reading to learn the CDC’s recommendations for safe cooking methods.

READ THIS: Never Put Meat in the Fridge Without Doing This First, CDC Warns.

Food poisoning is most common in chicken.

Salmonella It is believed to be responsible for approximately more foodborne illnesses According to the CDC, it is more common than any other bacteria. This bacteria can be found in chicken, which is a major source of the illness. About 1 out of every 25 chicken packages can be found in a grocery store. are contaminated with Salmonella, per a 2018 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) report.

Food poisoning is a condition that can be contracted from eating undercooked chicken. The CDC explains that you can also become sick if your diet contains raw chicken or its juices.

Now, a new report from the agency is delving into a concerning issue contributing to this food poisoning problem—how people are cooking certain kinds of chicken.

The CDC has issued warnings about certain chicken products.

The CDC released a new report Concerning the danger of food poisoning in chicken on Dec. The agency focused on frozen stuffed chicken products for this report. They have been repeatedly implicated in food poisoning. Salmonella The CDC stated that outbreaks are possible.

Since 1998 officials have linked According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), breaded and stuffed chicken products are susceptible to 14 different illnesses and approximately 200 other diseases.

What is the problem with breaded and stuffed poultry? The CDC states that these products are often partially cooked in order to bake the breading. This can sometimes make them appear to be cooked. Even though they look cooked, breaded chicken products must be fully cooked before being safe to eat. Kelly Johnson-ArborMD medical toxicology physician Director at the National Capital Poison Center. Best Life.

“Raw chicken and frozen stuffed chicken products such as Chicken Cordon Bleu must be cooked to at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit to kill foodborne pathogens like Salmonella. Salmonella,” Johnson-Arbor says.

The CDC says this is the “safe internal temperature” chicken must be cooked to—and if it’s not thoroughly cooked to that temperature, you could get sick if the chicken is contaminated.

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According to the agency, some appliances should not be used for cooking frozen chicken products.

In 2006, frozen breaded and stuffed poultry producers began to make changes to their labels in order “more clearly identify these product as raw,” according the CDC’s new report. According to the agency, many of the updated labels warn consumers not to use microwaves to cook them as this cooking method has been associated with outbreaks of ill health.

Johnson-Arbor states that microwave ovens do not heat frozen chicken products evenly, even if the chicken is covered or turned during cooking. “Moreover, microwave ovens with lower wattage (600Watts) do not heat frozen chicken products well enough to kill. Salmonella.”

This issue is not limited to microwaves. The updated labels no longer list instructions for using a conventional oven.

Johnson-Arbor says that while ovens can consistently achieve this temperature, microwave ovens (air fryers and toaster ovens) don’t always cook the chicken thoroughly to 165°F. This increases food poisoning risk.

This was confirmed by the CDC in its own report. “Studies indicate microwaves, ovens and toaster ovens inconsistently warm frozen stuffed chicken or freeze raw breaded poultry,” the agency stated.

This guideline is often ignored by many.

According to the CDC’s report on frozen breaded chicken products, there have been outbreaks that continue to occur even after labeling changes were made. Johnson-Arbor believes this is because “many people don’t read packaging instructions when they cook,” and the agency seems to confirm this.

Porter Novelli Public Services was commissioned by the CDC to conduct a survey between May and July 2022 that examined people’s frozen stuffed poultry preparation methods. Over 2,500 adults in the United States reported that 82.7 percent used an oven as their primary cooking appliance. More than half of respondents, however, reported using an oven. Also These chicken products were cooked in an oven that was not theirs.

The air fryer was the most popular non-oven appliance, with 29.7 percent reporting that they have used it to cook their chicken. 29% used a microwave, 13.79% used toaster ovens and 3.89% cooked with another appliance.

This is not surprising, as people increasingly turn to these appliances. Johnson-Arbor says that some people, such as college students and those in unstable housing situations or mobile home residents, might not have enough space to fit a traditional oven. Or, they may not be able to afford one. “Toaster ovens (microwaves) and air fryers are often less expensive than traditional ovens. They also take up less space which makes them attractive for many people.”

Johnson-Arbor suggests that a food thermometer be used if you intend to cook frozen chicken using a microwave, air fryer, or other cooking device. According to the toxicologist, this tool can ensure that your chicken is cooked to a minimum temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

“But if in doubt or a food temperaturemeter is not available, you should not eat raw poultry that has been cooked using an air fryer or microwave oven,” she concluded.

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